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The City of Kingston, NY

    Welcome to the City of Kingston, NY

    Kingston, dating to the arrival of the Dutch in 1652, is a vibrant city with rich history and architecture, was the state's first capital, and a thriving arts community. City Hall is in the heart of the community at 420 Broadway, and is open from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., except July & August (9 a.m. to 4 p.m.).  Come tour our historic City, with restaurants that are among the region's finest, and local shopping that promises unique finds.

    Historic Churches

    Kingston is home to many historic churches. The oldest church still standing is the First Reformed Protestant Dutch Church of Kingston which was organized in 1659. Referred to as The Old Dutch Church, it is located in Uptown Kingston. Many of the city's historic churches populate Wurts street (6 in one block) among them Hudson Valley Wedding Chapel is a recently restored church built in 1867 and now a chapel hosting weddings. Another church in the Rondout is located at 72 Spring Street. Trinity Evangelical Lutheran Church was founded in 1849. The original church building at the corner of Hunter Street and Ravine Street burned to the ground in the late 1850s. The current church on Spring Street was built in 1874.

    Kingston, NY

    Kingston became New York's first capital in 1777, and was burned by the British on October 13, 1777, after the Battles of Saratoga. In the 19th century, the city became an important transport hub after the discovery of natural cement in the region, and had both railroad and canal connections.

    Kingston, NY

    The town of Rondout, New York, now a part of the city of Kingston, became an important freight hub for the transportation of coal from Honesdale, Pennsylvania to New York City through the Delaware and Hudson Canal. This hub was later used to transport other goods, including bluestone. Kingston shaped and shipped most of the bluestone made to create the sidewalks of New York City.

     

    Contact Us

    City Hall Address:
    420 Broadway
    Kingston, New York
    12401

    Phone:
    (845) 331-0080

    Kingston News

    5/3/2021 - City of Kingston to Introduce New Police Initiatives

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    May 3, 2021 

     

    City of Kingston to Introduce New Police Initiatives

    Officer Engagement Will Seek to Improve Community Relations

     

    KINGSTON, NY – Mayor Steven T. Noble and the Kingston Police Department are pleased to announce that the City of Kingston will begin deploying several proactive police-community engagement initiatives, starting in May. 

    The initiatives include walking or bicycle patrols, attending community meeting and events, field information gathering, traffic details, and Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED). Details will be conducted on an overtime basis under the supervision of a police sergeant with officers who elect to participate.

    Each of the five participating sergeants will be given up to six hours of overtime per week to deploy at least two officers in one of the new operations. The sergeants will choose the timing of their deployment that best fits the initiative. Each sergeant will be reviewing any reports submitted by the officers and will provide a written summary of their operation to the Deputy Chief every two weeks and will provide monthly reports at Police Commission meetings. Any relevant data obtained from these reports will be sent to the Crime Analyst for compilation and analysis.    

    The focus will be community trust building and information gathering, however, if officers come across criminal activity, they may address it appropriately.  

    “We hope these initiatives will demonstrate our commitment to trust-building with true community policing endeavors, while also empowering our officers to take community engagement into their own hands with this grassroots approach,” said Mayor Noble. “This is a model that has not yet been seen in our area. We are proud to lead the way by introducing these new initiatives to garnering community trust while giving our officers autonomy over the public engagement process.”

    “We see this as a positive community policing initiative and anticipate it will be a highly effective response to the recent increase in gun violence,” said Chief Tinti. “A report from the New York Attorney General’s Office expressed concern over the law enforcement partnership conducted last year, and we have heard that loud and clear from our community as well. We know we need to approach police-community interaction differently, and we hope these positive initiatives will be a step in the right direction.” 

    “Engagement and forming partnerships with the community are essential aspects of community policing and is imperative when developing trust between police and citizens,” said Alderwoman Rita Worthington. “Toward that end, we remain committed to proactively building community relations with law enforcement through forums, events and meetings, and I remain positive that these police-community engagement initiatives will be one of many steps toward fostering that trust.”

    Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED) is a cooperative partnership between the Kingston Police Department and Building Department staff to provide property owners and tenants with assistance in property upgrades and repairs such as lighting installation, overgrowth removal, and other community-based issues that create a safer environment for all. 

    Studies on the impact of foot patrol efforts in high crime areas show reduction in violence and a significant gain of community knowledge and information.

    Helpful links:

    http://publichealthlawresearch.org/news/2013/12/foot-patrol-can-be-used-curb-violence-and-improve-public-health

    https://www.policefoundation.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/PF_Engaging-Comminities-One-Step-at-a-Time_Final.pdf

    https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11292-016-9271-1